What's your favourite poem?

For all you budding poets, place your poetry here for our members to enjoy. For all you avid readers discuss your books and recommend books to read here

Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby bugalugs1970 » Mon Mar 24, 2008 10:10 pm

"The Raven" by Edgar Allen Poe

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. *
"'Tis some visitor," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door -
Only this, and nothing more."


Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December,
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
Eagerly I wished the morrow; - vainly I had sought to borrow
From my books surcease of sorrow - sorrow for the lost Lenore -
For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore -
Nameless here for evermore.

And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain
Thrilled me - filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before;
So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating,
"'Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door -
Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door; -
This it is, and nothing more."

Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,
"Sir," said I, "or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore;
But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping,
And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door,
That I scarce was sure I heard you" - here I opened wide the door; -
Darkness there, and nothing more.

Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortals ever dared to dream before;
But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token,
And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, "Lenore!"
This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, "Lenore!" -
Merely this, and nothing more.

Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
"Surely," said I, "surely that is something at my window lattice:
Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore -
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore; -
'Tis the wind and nothing more."

Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,
In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore;
Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;
But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door -
Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door -
Perched, and sat, and nothing more.

Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore.
"Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou," I said, "art sure no craven,
Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the Nightly shore -
Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!"
Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore."

Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly,
Though its answer little meaning - little relevancy bore;
For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being
Ever yet was blest with seeing bird above his chamber door -
Bird or beast upon the sculptured bust above his chamber door,
With such name as "Nevermore."

But the raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only
That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour.
Nothing further then he uttered - not a feather then he fluttered -
Till I scarcely more than muttered, "other friends have flown before -
On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before."
Then the bird said, "Nevermore."

Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken,
"Doubtless," said I, "what it utters is its only stock and store,
Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful Disaster
Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore -
Till the dirges of his Hope that melancholy burden bore
Of 'Never - nevermore'."

But the Raven still beguiling all my fancy into smiling,
Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird, and bust and door;
Then upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking
Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore -
What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt and ominous bird of yore
Meant in croaking "Nevermore."

This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing
To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom's core;
This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining
On the cushion's velvet lining that the lamplight gloated o'er,
But whose velvet violet lining with the lamplight gloating o'er,
She shall press, ah, nevermore!

Then methought the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer
Swung by Seraphim whose footfalls tinkled on the tufted floor.
"Wretch," I cried, "thy God hath lent thee - by these angels he hath sent thee
Respite - respite and nepenthe, from thy memories of Lenore!
Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe and forget this lost Lenore!"
Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore."

"Prophet!" said I, "thing of evil! - prophet still, if bird or devil! -
Whether Tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore,
Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted -
On this home by horror haunted - tell me truly, I implore -
Is there - is there balm in Gilead? - tell me - tell me, I implore!"
Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore."

"Prophet!" said I, "thing of evil - prophet still, if bird or devil!
By that Heaven that bends above us - by that God we both adore -
Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn,
It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels name Lenore -
Clasp a rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore."
Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore."

"Be that word our sign in parting, bird or fiend," I shrieked, upstarting -
"Get thee back into the tempest and the Night's Plutonian shore!
Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken!
Leave my loneliness unbroken! - quit the bust above my door!
Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!"
Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore."

And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting
On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door;
And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming,
And the lamplight o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor;
And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor
Shall be lifted - nevermore!
I'm on the payroll........WHAT...you didn't know!!!!!!
http://petitions.pm.gov.uk/Savekids/
http://www.truthformadeleine.com
User avatar
bugalugs1970
Mafia Boss
 
Posts: 2270
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 9:24 pm
Location: Squirrel stalking in Breacon Beacons

Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby vanm » Tue Mar 25, 2008 1:21 am

Scribbler wrote:This is another of my favourites, that I'd like read at my funeral: it's an excerpt from Shelley's "The Cloud", but to me it speaks of the cycle of life, death and rebirth.

I am the daughter of Earth and Water
And the nursling of the Sky;
I pass through the pores of the oceans and shores
I change, but I cannot die.
For after the rain with never a stain
The pavilions of Heaven are bare,
And the winds and sunbeams with their convex gleams
Build up the blue dome of air,
I silently laugh at my own cenotaph,
And out of the caverns of rain,
Like a child from the womb, like a ghost from the tomb
I arise and unbuild it again.


I've never read that before and I love it.

This is just one my favourites by P/O John Gillespie Magee, 412 Squadron RCAF, killed 1941 aged 19.

Oh I have slipped the surly bonds of earth
And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
Sunward I've climbed and joined the tumbling mirth
Of sun-split clouds - and done a hundred things
You have not dreamed of -
wheeled and soared and swung
High in the sunlit silence.
Hov'ring there
I've chased the shouting wind along and flung
My eager craft through footless
halls of air.
Up, up the long delirious burning blue,
I've topped the wind-swept heights with easy grace
Where never lark or even eagle flew;
And while with silent, lifting mind I've trod
The high untrespassed sanctity of space,
Put out my hand and touched the face of God.


I love it because his exuberance and joy of life shines through.
beachy said: This is the hour to be brave.
User avatar
vanm
First Time Offender
 
Posts: 602
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 11:02 pm
Location: deep cesspit

Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby Scribbler » Tue Mar 25, 2008 5:15 pm

That's beautiful, vanm. I'm going to copy that out for my other half to read - he tells me he dreams a lot about flying and floating which he says is beautiful. I'm a bit jealous as I haven't had lovely dreams of flying since I was a young child. I think he'd enjoy that poem.

By the way, the poem I posted should read "For after the rain when with never a stain", not "for after the rain with never a stain".
User avatar
Scribbler
On Parole
 
Posts: 1093
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 3:00 pm
Location: Essex

Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby cushty » Tue Mar 25, 2008 6:42 pm

do you mean to say you copied it out yourself, Scribbler?

I'm impressed, if so - personally if there were no copy and paste I wouldn't have a favourite poem longer than 2 lines :)
User avatar
cushty
Mafia Boss
 
Posts: 3271
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 3:40 pm

Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby vanm » Tue Mar 25, 2008 9:44 pm

Hope OH enjoys it Scribbler. I regularly have flying dreams too!
beachy said: This is the hour to be brave.
User avatar
vanm
First Time Offender
 
Posts: 602
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 11:02 pm
Location: deep cesspit

Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby Buildafiredontget... » Wed Mar 26, 2008 12:09 am

Nae surprises here....

Got to be Robert Burns.

There is just something utterly beautiful in these lines from "Mary Morrison"

Tho' this was fair, and that was braw,
And yon the toast of a' the town,
I sigh'd, and said among them a',
"Ye are na Mary Morrison."


The last line encompasses and transcends every love poem written before or since.

And it is so simple.

So true.
User avatar
Buildafiredontget...
Local Lag
 
Posts: 811
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 4:34 pm
Location: Just along the road from Castle Craig, SCOTLAND.

Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby vanm » Wed Mar 26, 2008 12:54 am

If you say so.

Robbie wasn't a Gentleman. What's poetic about an insult?
beachy said: This is the hour to be brave.
User avatar
vanm
First Time Offender
 
Posts: 602
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 11:02 pm
Location: deep cesspit

Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby Scribbler » Wed Mar 26, 2008 2:04 pm

cushty wrote:do you mean to say you copied it out yourself, Scribbler?

I'm impressed, if so - personally if there were no copy and paste I wouldn't have a favourite poem longer than 2 lines :)


Sorry, Cushty, no I didn't. I copied and pasted it from another website. I had already corrected a couple of other errors before posting it, but had missed that one.
User avatar
Scribbler
On Parole
 
Posts: 1093
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 3:00 pm
Location: Essex

Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby Scribbler » Wed Mar 26, 2008 2:09 pm

vanm wrote:If you say so.

Robbie wasn't a Gentleman. What's poetic about an insult?


Maybe he didn't literally mean he said it to their faces, but rather thought "You're no Mary Morrison" or "None of you is like Mary Morrison". I suspect the poem is intended to compliment Mary Morrison as being EVEN better than all these fabulous, popular ladies, rather than doing the other ladies down.

I know what you mean though, vanm. I remember when I was young there was a chap who took a shine to me, and I was mortified when he came to the library where I worked and tried to pay me a clumsy compliment by insulting my colleague. He said to me "You look stunning," but then ruined it by glancing at my colleague and telling her how crappy she looked by comparison. She was obviously really hurt and I was furious with him. All I said though, was "The library isn't open to the public till 9 o clock." delivered in a very frosty, snooty tone! :lol: :lol: So I get what you mean about insults! :lol:
User avatar
Scribbler
On Parole
 
Posts: 1093
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 3:00 pm
Location: Essex

Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby vanm » Wed Mar 26, 2008 2:57 pm

:lol: You're right Scribbler I was being oversensitive - probably because it took me straight back to when I was about 24, coming downstairs at a party the host was standing at the foot and introduced me to the guy he was chatting to who looked straight at me and said "You're no spring chicken"! :shock: Anyway he turned out to be a bitter old queen who was later to be seen throwing up in the garden. :lol:
beachy said: This is the hour to be brave.
User avatar
vanm
First Time Offender
 
Posts: 602
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 11:02 pm
Location: deep cesspit

Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby chimaera » Wed Mar 26, 2008 4:14 pm

Just one? :shock:

It would have to be "A Poison Tree" by William Blake.

It was the first poem that made me really think.

I also like "Warning" by Jenny Joseph. I feel myself getting more and more like her!
Things are never so bad that they can't get worse.
User avatar
chimaera
On Parole
 
Posts: 1295
Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2007 12:02 pm

Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby Scribbler » Wed Mar 26, 2008 9:12 pm

vanm wrote::lol: You're right Scribbler I was being oversensitive - probably because it took me straight back to when I was about 24, coming downstairs at a party the host was standing at the foot and introduced me to the guy he was chatting to who looked straight at me and said "You're no spring chicken"! :shock: Anyway he turned out to be a bitter old queen who was later to be seen throwing up in the garden. :lol:


You were 24 when he said that to you! :shock: Anyone who'd wanted you to be much younger would be terribly close to being a paedophile! That aside, some people can only feel good about themselves by doing their damnedest to make someone else feel bad about THEMselves. I bet that host wanted to slap the old tart!
User avatar
Scribbler
On Parole
 
Posts: 1093
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 3:00 pm
Location: Essex

Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby horsegirl » Wed Mar 26, 2008 9:37 pm

Valentine Ackland , lesbian erotica. Also Sylvia Townsend Warner, same reason 8) . I love Christina Rossetti and Emily Bronte, and Robert Frost also :)
User avatar
horsegirl
First Time Offender
 
Posts: 567
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2008 1:10 pm
Location: Darkest Dorset

Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby cushty » Wed Mar 26, 2008 10:31 pm

here's one for all us cat lovers - get a hankie first though


Last Words To A Dumb Friend by Thomas Hardy

Pet was never mourned as you,
Purrer of the spotless hue,
Plumy tail, and wistful gaze
While you humoured our queer ways,
Or outshrilled your morning call
Up the stairs and through the hall--
Foot suspended in its fall--
While, expectant, you would stand
Arched, to meet the stroking hand;
Till your way you chose to wend
Yonder, to your tragic end.

Never another pet for me!
Let your place all vacant be;
Better blankness day by day
Than companion torn away.
Better bid his memory fade,
Better blot each mark he made,
Selfishly escape distress
By contrived forgetfulness,
Than preserve his prints to make
Every morn and eve an ache.

From the chair whereon he sat
Sweep his fur, nor wince thereat;
Rake his little pathways out
Mid the bushes roundabout;
Smooth away his talons' mark
From the claw-worn pine-tree bark,
Where he climbed as dusk embrowned,
Waiting us who loitered round.

Strange it is this speechless thing,
Subject to our mastering,
Subject for his life and food
To our gift, and time, and mood;
Timid pensioner of us Powers,
His existence ruled by ours,
Should - by crossing at a breath
Into safe and shielded death,
By the merely taking hence
Of his insignificance--
Loom as largened to the sense,
Shape as part, above man's will,
Of the Imperturbable.

As a prisoner, flight debarred,
Exercising in a yard,
Still retain I, troubled, shaken,
Mean estate, by him forsaken;
And this home, which scarcely took
Impress from his little look,
By his faring to the Dim
Grows all eloquent of him.

Housemate, I can think you still
Bounding to the window-sill,
Over which I vaguely see
Your small mound beneath the tree,
Showing in the autumn shade
That you moulder where you played.
User avatar
cushty
Mafia Boss
 
Posts: 3271
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 3:40 pm

Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby vanm » Wed Mar 26, 2008 11:23 pm

cushty that is heartbreaking. Thank you.

I'm in floods of tears but the gin consumed tonight probably contributed.

What eloquence of love to all cat-lovers that poem is.
Last edited by vanm on Wed Mar 26, 2008 11:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
beachy said: This is the hour to be brave.
User avatar
vanm
First Time Offender
 
Posts: 602
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 11:02 pm
Location: deep cesspit

PreviousNext

Return to Poetry and Prose & Book Club

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests