What's your favourite poem?

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Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby Carrie » Mon Mar 24, 2008 8:06 am

PantsOfGanga wrote:God, I'm such a common pleb. First not doing novels and now not really being moved by poetry. At school I used to always get top marks for writing my own, but the only poetry that has any emotional impact on me is the poetry that is song lyrics.



You like song lyrics, so you like poetry! So, tell us your favourite song lyrics...

(I love Amy Winehouse's lyrics)
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Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby Mr.Shifter » Mon Mar 24, 2008 11:17 am

As well as The Highwayman (which has already been said) I love

The lady of Shallot

On either side the river lie
Long fields of barley and of rye,
That clothe the wold and meet the sky;
And through the field the road run by
To many-tower'd Camelot;
And up and down the people go,
Gazing where the lilies blow
Round an island there below,
The island of Shalott.

Willows whiten, aspens quiver,
Little breezes dusk and shiver
Through the wave that runs for ever
By the island in the river
Flowing down to Camelot.
Four grey walls, and four grey towers,
Overlook a space of flowers,
And the silent isle imbowers
The Lady of Shalott.

By the margin, willow veil'd,
Slide the heavy barges trail'd
By slow horses; and unhail'd
The shallop flitteth silken-sail'd
Skimming down to Camelot:
But who hath seen her wave her hand?
Or at the casement seen her stand?
Or is she known in all the land,
The Lady of Shalott?

Only reapers, reaping early,
In among the bearded barley
Hear a song that echoes cheerly
From the river winding clearly;
Down to tower'd Camelot;
And by the moon the reaper weary,
Piling sheaves in uplands airy,
Listening, whispers, " 'Tis the fairy
The Lady of Shalott."

There she weaves by night and day
A magic web with colours gay.
She has heard a whisper say,
A curse is on her if she stay
To look down to Camelot.
She knows not what the curse may be,
And so she weaveth steadily,
And little other care hath she,
The Lady of Shalott.

And moving through a mirror clear
That hangs before her all the year,
Shadows of the world appear.
There she sees the highway near
Winding down to Camelot;
There the river eddy whirls,
And there the surly village churls,
And the red cloaks of market girls
Pass onward from Shalott.

Sometimes a troop of damsels glad,
An abbot on an ambling pad,
Sometimes a curly shepherd lad,
Or long-hair'd page in crimson clad
Goes by to tower'd Camelot;
And sometimes through the mirror blue
The knights come riding two and two.
She hath no loyal Knight and true,
The Lady of Shalott.

But in her web she still delights
To weave the mirror's magic sights,
For often through the silent nights
A funeral, with plumes and lights
And music, went to Camelot;
Or when the Moon was overhead,
Came two young lovers lately wed.
"I am half sick of shadows," said
The Lady of Shalott.

A bow-shot from her bower-eaves,
He rode between the barley sheaves,
The sun came dazzling thro' the leaves,
And flamed upon the brazen greaves
Of bold Sir Lancelot.
A red-cross knight for ever kneel'd
To a lady in his shield,
That sparkled on the yellow field,
Beside remote Shalott.

The gemmy bridle glitter'd free,
Like to some branch of stars we see
Hung in the golden Galaxy.
The bridle bells rang merrily
As he rode down to Camelot:
And from his blazon'd baldric slung
A mighty silver bugle hung,
And as he rode his armor rung
Beside remote Shalott.

All in the blue unclouded weather
Thick-jewell'd shone the saddle-leather,
The helmet and the helmet-feather
Burn'd like one burning flame together,
As he rode down to Camelot.
As often thro' the purple night,
Below the starry clusters bright,
Some bearded meteor, burning bright,
Moves over still Shalott.

His broad clear brow in sunlight glow'd;
On burnish'd hooves his war-horse trode;
From underneath his helmet flow'd
His coal-black curls as on he rode,
As he rode down to Camelot.
From the bank and from the river
He flashed into the crystal mirror,
"Tirra lirra," by the river
Sang Sir Lancelot.

She left the web, she left the loom,
She made three paces through the room,
She saw the water-lily bloom,
She saw the helmet and the plume,
She look'd down to Camelot.
Out flew the web and floated wide;
The mirror crack'd from side to side;
"The curse is come upon me," cried
The Lady of Shalott.

In the stormy east-wind straining,
The pale yellow woods were waning,
The broad stream in his banks complaining.
Heavily the low sky raining
Over tower'd Camelot;
Down she came and found a boat
Beneath a willow left afloat,
And around about the prow she wrote
The Lady of Shalott.

And down the river's dim expanse
Like some bold seer in a trance,
Seeing all his own mischance --
With a glassy countenance
Did she look to Camelot.
And at the closing of the day
She loosed the chain, and down she lay;
The broad stream bore her far away,
The Lady of Shalott.

Lying, robed in snowy white
That loosely flew to left and right --
The leaves upon her falling light --
Thro' the noises of the night,
She floated down to Camelot:
And as the boat-head wound along
The willowy hills and fields among,
They heard her singing her last song,
The Lady of Shalott.

Heard a carol, mournful, holy,
Chanted loudly, chanted lowly,
Till her blood was frozen slowly,
And her eyes were darkened wholly,
Turn'd to tower'd Camelot.
For ere she reach'd upon the tide
The first house by the water-side,
Singing in her song she died,
The Lady of Shalott.

Under tower and balcony,
By garden-wall and gallery,
A gleaming shape she floated by,
Dead-pale between the houses high,
Silent into Camelot.
Out upon the wharfs they came,
Knight and Burgher, Lord and Dame,
And around the prow they read her name,
The Lady of Shalott.

Who is this? And what is here?
And in the lighted palace near
Died the sound of royal cheer;
And they crossed themselves for fear,
All the Knights at Camelot;
But Lancelot mused a little space
He said, "She has a lovely face;
God in his mercy lend her grace,
The Lady of Shalott."
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Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby Carrie » Mon Mar 24, 2008 11:43 am

I love The Lady of Shallot too...

and I like My Last Duchess, by Browning:

http://www.sparknotes.com/poetry/browni ... ion3.rhtml
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Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby cushty » Mon Mar 24, 2008 11:46 am

I love Browning's narrative poems - and this one by Tennyson has the most wonderful rhythm

.
Break, break, break,
On thy cold gray stones, O Sea!
And I would that my tongue could utter
The thoughts that arise in me.

O, well for the fisherman's boy,
That he shouts with his sister at play!
O, well for the sailor lad,
That he sings in his boat on the bay!

And the stately ships go on
To their haven under the hill;
But O for the touch of a vanished hand,
And the sound of a voice that is still!

Break, break, break,
At the foot of thy crags, O Sea!
But the tender grace of a day that is dead
Will never come back to me.
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Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby Carrie » Mon Mar 24, 2008 12:02 pm

That's great Cushty:

My lad has just covered The Pied Piper at school - I forgot how wonderful it is:

http://www.indiana.edu/~librcsd/etext/piper/05.html
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Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby Bat E Bird » Mon Mar 24, 2008 12:17 pm

I'm not big on poems but love this one and I love all of Morrissey's lyrics.

Albert and the Lion

Thurs a famous seaside place called Blackpool, thats noted fur fresh air an fun, an Mr and Mrs Ramsbottom, went thur with Albert, thur son.

A grand likley lad were young Albert, all dressed in his best, quite a swell, id a stick wee an orses ed andle, the finest that Woolworths could sell.

Nah, thi dint think much tu thocean , waves wur all figgly an small, thur wur no wrecks an nobody drownded, fact, nowt much to laugh at adall.

So, seeking fur further amusement, thi paid un went into the zoo, thi wur lions an tigers an camuls, an owld ale an sandwiches too.

thur were one owd Lion called Wallace; is nose wur all covered in scars, anny lay in a somnolent posture, wi the side of his ed uptu bars.

Albert ud urd ALL about Lions, an ow thi were ferocious an wild-an tu see Wallace lying, so peaceful, well, it dint seem reet tu child.

So straightaway, brave little fella, not showin a morsel of fear, took the stick....wi thorses ead andle, an poked it in Wallaces ear.

Well, you could see as the Lion dint like it, an givin a kind of a roll, pulled Albert inside the cage with im, un swallowed the little lad, ole.

Then Pa, who had seen the occurrence, un din know what to do next, Shouted, "Mother! Yon Lions ett Albert", an Mother said "Eeeeeh, I am vexed!"

Then Mr and Mrs Ramsbottom....quite rightly, when alls said and done, complained to the Animal keeper, that the Lion had etten their son.

Now the keeper was quite nice about it, an he said "what a nasty mishap, are you sure its thi boy thad hes etten?" Pa said "yeh" an proved it by showin his cap.

Well, the Manager had to be sent for, an he came an he said "Wats tu do? Pa said "Yon Lions just ett our Albert, an im in his Sunday best too."

Then Mother said "Luckeer young fella, Ah think its a shame an a sin, fur your lion tu go and eat Albert, an after wi paid to come in."

The Manager wanted no trouble, so he took out his purse right away, sayin "how much to settle the matter?" said Pa, "What dyu usually pay?"

But Mother had turned reet awkward, when she thowt wur her Albert had gone.."No! someones got to be summonsed!" said she, and that was decided upon.

Then off they went to the Police station, in front of the magistrate chap, they told im what happened to Albert, an proved it by showing his cap.

The magistrate gave his opinion, an that no-one were really to blame, And he said that he "hoped the Ramsbottoms, would av further sons to thur name."

At that, Mother got proper blazin, an "thank you sir kindly", said she, "What,. waste all mi life rearing childer? Tu feed b****y Lions? NOT ME".


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Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby Carrie » Mon Mar 24, 2008 12:22 pm

Batty: I can remember when they used to play a recording of that on Junior Choice (now I am showing my age - lol).

Yes, I love Morrisey's lyrics too ....so optimistic and heartening :wink:
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Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby Bat E Bird » Mon Mar 24, 2008 12:27 pm

hippychick1 wrote:Batty: I can remember when they used to play a recording of that on Junior Choice (now I am showing my age - lol).

Yes, I love Morrisey's lyrics too ....so optimistic and heartening :wink:


Happy, happy, happy :wink:

And if a double-decker bus
Crashes into us
To die by your side
Is such a heavenly way to die
And if a ten-ton truck
Kills the both of us
To die by your side
Well, the pleasure - the privilege is mine


:D

The first Smiths album was permanently on my turntable for months and months.

Those were the days. :D
Say what you want and be who you are because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind - Dr. Seuss
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Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby Mr.Shifter » Mon Mar 24, 2008 12:35 pm

Bat E Bird wrote:I'm not big on poems but love this one and I love all of Morrissey's lyrics.

Albert and the Lion




And 'The Return of Albert'

You've 'eard 'ow young Albert Ramsbottom, In the Zoo up at Blackpool one year,
With a stick with an 'orse's 'ead 'andle, Gave a lion a poke in the ear.
The name of the lion was Wallace, The poke in the ear made 'im wild ;
And before you could say " Bob's your Uncle," 'E'd up and 'e'd swallered the child.
'E were sorry the moment 'e'd done it, With children 'e'd always been chums,
And besides, 'e'd no teeth in 'is noddle, And 'e couldn't chew Albert on t' gums.
'E could feel the lad moving inside 'im, As 'e lay on 'is bed of dried ferns,
And it might 'ave been little lad's birthday, 'E wished 'im such 'appy returns.

But Albert kept kicking and fighting, Till Wallace arose feeling bad,
And felt it were time that 'e started to stage A come-back for the lad.
So with 'is 'ead down in a corner, On 'is front paws 'e started to walk,
And 'e coughed and 'e sneezed and 'e gargled, Till Albert shot out like a cork.

Old Wallace felt better direc'ly, And 'is figure once more became lean,
But the only difference with Albert Was 'is face and 'is 'ands were quite clean.
Meanwhile Mister and Missus Ramsbottom 'Ad gone 'ome to tea feeling blue ;
Ma says " I feel down in the mouth like," Pa says " Aye! I bet Albert does too."

Said Ma " It just goes for to show yer That the future is never revealed,
If I thought we was going to lose 'im I'd 'ave not 'ad 'is boots soled and 'eeled."
" Let's look on the bright side," said Father, " What can't be 'elped must be endured,
Every cloud 'as a silvery lining, And we did 'ave young Albert insured."

A knock at the door came that moment As Father these kind words did speak,
'Twas the man from t' Prudential, E'd called for their " tuppence per person per week."
When Father saw who 'ad been knocking, 'E laughed and 'e kept laughing so,
That the young man said " What's there to laugh at ?" Pa said " You'll laugh an' all when you know."

" Excuse 'im for laughing," said Mother, " But really things 'appen so strange,
Our Albert's been ate by a lion, You've got to pay us for a change."
Said the young feller from the Prudential, " Now, come come, let's understand this,
You don't mean to say that you've lost'im?" Ma says " Oh, no ! we know where 'e is."

Whentheyoung man 'ad 'eard all the details, A bag from 'is pocket he drew,
And 'e paid them, with int'rest and bonus, The sum of nine pounds four and two.
Pa 'ad scarce got 'is 'and on the money When a face at the window they see,
And Mother says " Eeh ! look, it's Albert," And Father says " Aye, it would be."

Young Albert came in all excited, And started 'is story to give,
And Pa says " I'll never trust lions again, Not as long as I live."
The young feller from the Prudential To pick up the money began,
And Father says " Eeh ! just a moment, Don't be in a hurry, young man."

Then giving young Albert a shilling, He said " Pop off back to the Zoo.
'Ere's yer stick with the 'orse's 'ead 'andle, Go and see what the Tigers can do ! "
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Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby Bat E Bird » Mon Mar 24, 2008 12:42 pm

LOL Mr. Shifter.

You beat me to it. I was just going to look for that one. :D
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Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby diddy » Mon Mar 24, 2008 12:58 pm

Albert and the Lion, an absolute classic.
I love it!
I also like La Belle Dame sans Merci.
And Stop all the Clocks.
The charade must go on.
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Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby Carrie » Mon Mar 24, 2008 1:23 pm

diddy wrote:Albert and the Lion, an absolute classic.
I love it!
I also like La Belle Dame sans Merci.
And Stop all the Clocks.


I can't hear or read the last one on your list now, without the "Four Weddings" scene coming into my mind! Great poem.

Anyone like Shamus Healey?
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Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby diddy » Mon Mar 24, 2008 2:45 pm

hippychick1 wrote:
diddy wrote:Albert and the Lion, an absolute classic.
I love it!
I also like La Belle Dame sans Merci.
And Stop all the Clocks.


I can't hear or read the last one on your list now, without the "Four Weddings" scene coming into my mind! Great poem.



Yes, I think it's like that for a lot of people!
Mind you, I think it was well done.
Also like "If"
Still makes a lot of sense, so many years later!
The charade must go on.
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Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby Scribbler » Mon Mar 24, 2008 2:46 pm

This is another of my favourites, that I'd like read at my funeral: it's an excerpt from Shelley's "The Cloud", but to me it speaks of the cycle of life, death and rebirth.

I am the daughter of Earth and Water
And the nursling of the Sky;
I pass through the pores of the oceans and shores
I change, but I cannot die.
For after the rain with never a stain
The pavilions of Heaven are bare,
And the winds and sunbeams with their convex gleams
Build up the blue dome of air,
I silently laugh at my own cenotaph,
And out of the caverns of rain,
Like a child from the womb, like a ghost from the tomb
I arise and unbuild it again.
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Re: What's your favourite poem?

Postby diddy » Mon Mar 24, 2008 7:51 pm

ejm wrote:
PantsOfGanga wrote:God, I'm such a common pleb. First not doing novels and now not really being moved by poetry. At school I used to always get top marks for writing my own, but the only poetry that has any emotional impact on me is the poetry that is song lyrics.


Same here, I couldn't name one poem :oops:


I bet you could both quote a couple of lines if you thought about it.
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