The Echo - Discussion open on the whole book

For all you budding poets, place your poetry here for our members to enjoy. For all you avid readers discuss your books and recommend books to read here

Re: The Echo - Discussion open on first 6 chapters

Postby Torti » Sat May 17, 2008 2:38 am

Cushty, I finished the book three days ago--I'm a fast reader, but I do a reread for nuances.

Have you read the Jack Whyte Camulod Chronicles-Eagles series yet? They're great. (All nine or so books!)
"Cat: One hell of a nice animal frequently mistaken for a meatloaf."--B. Kliban
Torti
Suspect
 
Posts: 152
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2008 2:46 am

Re: The Echo - Discussion open on first 6 chapters

Postby cushty » Sun May 18, 2008 6:02 pm

Torti wrote:Cushty, I finished the book three days ago--I'm a fast reader, but I do a reread for nuances.

Have you read the Jack Whyte Camulod Chronicles-Eagles series yet? They're great. (All nine or so books!)


never even heard of them Torti

tell me more

meanwhile, the whole of the Echo is up for discussion

good or what...........................

and who is going to put up the next books for choosing - volunteers wanted
User avatar
cushty
Mafia Boss
 
Posts: 3271
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 3:40 pm

Re: The Echo - Discussion open on the whole book

Postby cushty » Tue May 20, 2008 3:10 pm

I'll wrap this up then

obviously the enthusiasm for a reading group doesn't extend to actually participating

hope those who read 'The Echo' enjoyed it anyway - I know I did
User avatar
cushty
Mafia Boss
 
Posts: 3271
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 3:40 pm

Re: The Echo - Discussion open on the whole book

Postby chimaera » Tue May 20, 2008 5:11 pm

I found it a bit dire, Cushty. It read to me rather formulaeic. You know the saying; "If in doubt, re-write Cinderella."? Well, I found it like that. I seemed to know the plot, as such. Only this wasn't Cinderella, but definitely seemed to follow a story that I have heard before, but with a different subtext.

First time I've read one of her books. Is this typical?
Things are never so bad that they can't get worse.
User avatar
chimaera
On Parole
 
Posts: 1295
Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2007 12:02 pm

Re: The Echo - Discussion open on the whole book

Postby Torti » Tue May 20, 2008 7:24 pm

I found the device of using Lawrence to get information into the story to be of some interest.

The character of Mike Deacon was fairly well-rounded and I got a feel for him as a person. Never did for Amanda, she appeared to me to be more of an object than a person.
"Cat: One hell of a nice animal frequently mistaken for a meatloaf."--B. Kliban
Torti
Suspect
 
Posts: 152
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2008 2:46 am

Re: The Echo - Discussion open on the whole book

Postby cushty » Tue May 20, 2008 9:31 pm

did you think the introduction of characters from the world of the down and out, or derelicts - such an awful description of human beings - was unusual and insightful?

I think Amanda was intended to be a shell

Billy wanted to humanise her, and by his death he did - the way she buried him etc.
User avatar
cushty
Mafia Boss
 
Posts: 3271
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 3:40 pm

Re: The Echo - Discussion open on the whole book

Postby Torti » Wed May 21, 2008 2:03 am

I don't think the usage of the down and outers is that unusual, but it was insightful as this group is one segment of society that is usually overlooked. One never really knows who (or what) a derelict really was before. Some are there (down and out) by circumstance, others by direct choice.
"Cat: One hell of a nice animal frequently mistaken for a meatloaf."--B. Kliban
Torti
Suspect
 
Posts: 152
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2008 2:46 am

Re: The Echo - Discussion open on the whole book

Postby nurgis » Thu May 22, 2008 9:20 am

I am sorry my friends, but I have been very busy lately.
My Hubby is now reading the book and is liking it very much.
As he is more used to American English it was so sweet when he asked me
who carries the title PC. :D
For me it was like opening a window into the lives of the down and out.
I found it interesting and also the relationship between the reporter and
the young boy. Both longing for some sort of a familie but that could not
happen with them.
What I think was a let down was the caracter working in the archives.
He was to pretictable. Not all nerds have to be sexualy impared.
NO more ice please and justice for Maddie
User avatar
nurgis
Local Lag
 
Posts: 814
Joined: Wed Nov 28, 2007 10:36 pm
Location: Iceland

Re: The Echo - Discussion open on the whole book

Postby Torti » Thu May 22, 2008 2:48 pm

nurgis, don't be sorry for being busy. There are times when real life gets in the way and we have to do something else. My daughter-in-law is organizing a "yard sale" for spring cleaning, and I'm invited to participate by bringing any contributions from my house over to hers. This gives me one week to go through 10 years of collecting with little discarding, so I am busy also.

I enjoyed reading this book and looking at the different characters and their relationships. Mike Deacons's family, friends and business associates, Terry the 14 year old down and outer, even Amanda, form a framework that eventually ties together.

I think I'll try another of this author's books. I might like it.
"Cat: One hell of a nice animal frequently mistaken for a meatloaf."--B. Kliban
Torti
Suspect
 
Posts: 152
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2008 2:46 am

Re: The Echo - Discussion open on the whole book

Postby cushty » Thu May 22, 2008 3:47 pm

Torti wrote:nurgis, don't be sorry for being busy. There are times when real life gets in the way and we have to do something else. My daughter-in-law is organizing a "yard sale" for spring cleaning, and I'm invited to participate by bringing any contributions from my house over to hers. This gives me one week to go through 10 years of collecting with little discarding, so I am busy also.

I enjoyed reading this book and looking at the different characters and their relationships. Mike Deacons's family, friends and business associates, Terry the 14 year old down and outer, even Amanda, form a framework that eventually ties together.

I think I'll try another of this author's books. I might like it.


one of the reasons I liked 'The Echo' was that there was no romance - male bonding was central and that made a nice change

in the TV serial made of it the scenes around the Christmas cooking were especially well done, and of course the Thames figured a lot

'The Sculptress' is probably Minette Walters most read book - I wouldn't personally recommend any after 'The Dark Room' as I think the plots of her later books are more contrived
User avatar
cushty
Mafia Boss
 
Posts: 3271
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 3:40 pm

Re: The Echo - Discussion open on the whole book

Postby Torti » Thu May 22, 2008 4:24 pm

I found a copy of The Scold's Bridle at my local library and am going to give it a try. I'll let you know what I think later.

The male character's interactions in The Echo were very good. Female authors all too frequently gloss over this aspect of life. Ms Walters handled it well, I think.
"Cat: One hell of a nice animal frequently mistaken for a meatloaf."--B. Kliban
Torti
Suspect
 
Posts: 152
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2008 2:46 am

Re: The Echo - Discussion open on the whole book

Postby cushty » Thu May 22, 2008 4:34 pm

Torti wrote:I found a copy of The Scold's Bridle at my local library and am going to give it a try. I'll let you know what I think later.

The male character's interactions in The Echo were very good. Female authors all too frequently gloss over this aspect of life. Ms Walters handled it well, I think.



does your local library rent out DVDs? 'The Echo' and 'The Scold's Bridle' were excellent, and you might find them there

my library charges £1.50 for 7 days for a DVD, which is very good value, I think
User avatar
cushty
Mafia Boss
 
Posts: 3271
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 3:40 pm

Re: The Echo - Discussion open on the whole book

Postby Torti » Thu May 22, 2008 7:31 pm

cushty wrote:
Torti wrote:I found a copy of The Scold's Bridle at my local library and am going to give it a try. I'll let you know what I think later.

The male character's interactions in The Echo were very good. Female authors all too frequently gloss over this aspect of life. Ms Walters handled it well, I think.



does your local library rent out DVDs? 'The Echo' and 'The Scold's Bridle' were excellent, and you might find them there

my library charges £1.50 for 7 days for a DVD, which is very good value, I think


I just took a quick peek online at the library catalog and there are at least two of Ms Walters's books on DVD (can't remember which ones). I'm not sure if there is a fee for DVD usage at our library unless it's overdue and you are charged a small fine.

It's interesting to read the book, watch a DVD and compare. What was changed, compressed, edited, omitted? Some books do not translate well to visual media at all, others are changed beyond recognition. Few are good.
"Cat: One hell of a nice animal frequently mistaken for a meatloaf."--B. Kliban
Torti
Suspect
 
Posts: 152
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2008 2:46 am

Re: The Echo - Discussion open on the whole book

Postby nurgis » Thu May 22, 2008 8:03 pm

cushty wrote:
Torti wrote:nurgis, don't be sorry for being busy. There are times when real life gets in the way and we have to do something else. My daughter-in-law is organizing a "yard sale" for spring cleaning, and I'm invited to participate by bringing any contributions from my house over to hers. This gives me one week to go through 10 years of collecting with little discarding, so I am busy also.

I enjoyed reading this book and looking at the different characters and their relationships. Mike Deacons's family, friends and business associates, Terry the 14 year old down and outer, even Amanda, form a framework that eventually ties together.

I think I'll try another of this author's books. I might like it.


one of the reasons I liked 'The Echo' was that there was no romance - male bonding was central and that made a nice change

in the TV serial made of it the scenes around the Christmas cooking were especially well done, and of course the Thames figured a lot

'The Sculptress' is probably Minette Walters most read book - I wouldn't personally recommend any after 'The Dark Room' as I think the plots of her later books are more contrived


I envy you two to have the access to your libraries and rent out DVDs. :roll:
Torti you will let us know how you find her other books. I will be on the lookout next time I leave the country.
Chusty, I agree with you that the male bonding was a nice change. Writers should explore that field more Ms. Walters does it quite well.
NO more ice please and justice for Maddie
User avatar
nurgis
Local Lag
 
Posts: 814
Joined: Wed Nov 28, 2007 10:36 pm
Location: Iceland

Re: The Echo - Discussion open on the whole book

Postby Iseult » Sun May 25, 2008 4:08 pm

Hi Cushty

I didn't even realise "Poetry and Prose & Book Club" existed until today
Then I realised you were all reading "The Echo". I love Minette Walters.

I am a book worm in the true sense of the word. I have to have a book on the go at all times. My favourite place to read is in the bath. I can be in there for hours :D It's the only place I get any peace. Teenagers and toddler. Enough said...

I stumbled across "Acid Row" and was so impressed I gave it to my teenage daughter to read. She took it to school and the teacher asked her what she was reading. She said a book about paedophiles :lol:
I think it is an excellent book. With a real message behind the story.

____________________________________

Acid Row
"The name the beleaguered inhabitants give to their 'sink' estate. A no-man's land of single mothers and fatherless children- where angry, alienated youth controls the streets.

Into this battlefield comes Sophie Morrison, a young doctor visiting a patient in Acid Row. little does she know that she is entering the home of a known paedophile...and with reports circulating that a tormented child called Amy has disappeared, the vigilantes are out in force...

Soon Sophie is trapped at the centre of a terrifying siege, with a man she has come to despise.

Whipped to a frenzy by unsubstantiated rumour, the mob unleashes its hatred. Against authority...the law...and 'the pervert'. 'Protecting Amy' becomes the catch-all defence for the terrible events that follow. And if murder is part of it, then so be it.

But is Amy really missing?...

'Walters handles the teeming cast and the buildup of danger and suspense authoritatively, from the opening whispers to the inevitable fatalities. Her real achievement here, however, is in the oddly sympathetic paedophile, the angry heroine, her ex-con rescuer, the pitifully unformed teenage provocateurs, Amy's wilfully irresponsible mother and her smoothly complicit father, and an underage victim who turns out to be just as exploitative, though a lot less powerful, than the plausible scoundrel who preys on her... the compulsive strands in Walters' largest web yet... all show the damning effects of helplessly raging long-term victims thrashing out to hurt anyone in reach.'

Kirkus Reviews

http://www.minettewalters.co.uk/books/acid_row.htm

______________________________________

Well since then I have been hooked. I have read in no particular order:

The Ice House
The Sculptress
The Scold's Bridle
The Dark Room
The Echo
Fox Evil
Disordered Minds
The Devil's Feather
The Tinder Box

At the moment I am reading The Chameleon's Shadow.

I have to say, "The Echo" is not as good as some of her other book's. IMO
"Man can live about forty days without food, about three days without water, about eight minutes without air, but only for one second without hope"

Shalom Aleichem.
User avatar
Iseult
Been Cautioned
 
Posts: 346
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 10:11 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Poetry and Prose & Book Club

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests
cron