"Bloat" - Second Biggest Killer In Dogs

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"Bloat" - Second Biggest Killer In Dogs

Postby OoBubblesoO » Thu May 29, 2008 9:27 am

This morning, my Plummer Terrier was having trouble breathing after scoffing dried dog biscuits. He never chews, just swallows biscuits full.

Anyway, hubby started panicking, chasing the dog around and feeling his stomach. I didn't know what was going on but hubby was in a right tizzy and said he needed to get the dog to the vet if he didn't stop 'licking the air' :shock: I had no idea, but hubby is what you could call an 'expert' in dogs health (I wind him up by saying he worries too much lmao - coming from someone who suffers severe anxiety, it's a bit rich eh?) :P

So, I decided to check this "bloat" out. WOW! Its the second biggest killer next to cancer...

How many of you have heard of this? I didn't know until this morning but what i've read has shocked me. No wonder hubby was freaking. I owe him an apology I think :oops:

Heres the link:

http://www.globalspan.net/bloat.htm

Apparently it takes less than an hour to kill your dog :(

From the site: "If you believe your dog is experiencing bloat, please get your dog to a veterinarian immediately! Bloat can kill in less than an hour, so time is of the essence. Notify your vet to alert them you're on your way with a suspected bloat case. Better to be safe than sorry!"

And some of the symptoms:

" Attempts to vomit (usually unsuccessful); may occur every 5-30 minutes This seems to be one of the most common symptoms & has been referred to as the "hallmark symptom"
"Unsuccessful vomiting" means either nothing comes up or possibly just foam and/or mucous comes up

Doesn't act like usual self Perhaps the earliest warning sign and may be the only sign that almost always occurs
We've had several reports that dogs who bloated asked to go outside in the middle of the night. If this is combined with frequent attempts to vomit, and if your dog doesn't typically ask to go outside in the middle of the night, bloat is a very real possibility.

Significant anxiety and restlessness
One of the earliest warning signs and seems fairly typical
"Hunched up" or "roached up" appearance
This seems to occur fairly frequently
Lack of normal gurgling and digestive sounds in the tummy Many dog owners report this after putting their ear to their dog's tummy.
If your dog shows any bloat symptoms, you may want to try this immediately.

Bloated abdomen that may feel tight (like a drum)
Despite the term "bloat," many times this symptom never occurs or is not apparent
Pale or off-color gums
Dark red in early stages, white or blue in later stages
Coughing
Unproductive gagging
Heavy salivating or drooling
Foamy mucous around the lips, or vomiting foamy mucous
Unproductive attempts to defecate
Whining
Pacing
Licking the air
Seeking a hiding place
Looking at their side or other evidence of abdominal pain or discomfort
May refuse to lie down or even sit down
May stand spread-legged
May curl up in a ball or go into a praying or crouched position
May attempt to eat small stones and twigs
Drinking excessively
Heavy or rapid panting
Shallow breathing
Cold mouth membranes
Apparent weakness; unable to stand or has a spread-legged stance
Especially in advanced stage
Accelerated heartbeat
Heart rate increases as bloating progresses
Weak pulse
Collapse "

So please people, be warned and educated on this disease. It could save your dog's life if you know the symptoms and how to react in suspected cases....
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Re: "Bloat" - Second Biggest Killer In Dogs

Postby PantsOfGanga » Thu May 29, 2008 10:41 am

I've owned shar-pei for about 12 years and it's pretty common in the breed. It usually affects large, deep chested breeds, but any dog can fall victim to it. It's horrible - my friend lost her old girl to it. She found her early one morning with her stomach swollen and rushed her to the emergency vets, but he couldn't save her. He opened her up and the tissue where it had twisted at the entrance and exit to the stomach were already neccrotic. She must have bloated in her sleep and hadn't even cried to wake my friend up.

I never feed more than a few pieces of dry food without soaking it first. You'll be shocked how much many dried complete foods can swell - they can double or even treble in size and you really don't want your dog eating a full stomach of dry food then taking a drink. The one I feed doesn't, but I soak it anyway because imagine eating a load of cream crackers yourself. You'd be thirsty, drink a load of water and end up with stomach cramps. Luckily, people's stomachs can't roll and twist like a dogs if there is too much gas in them.

How is your doggy? I hope it was just a false alarm.
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Re: "Bloat" - Second Biggest Killer In Dogs

Postby OoBubblesoO » Thu May 29, 2008 11:37 am

PantsOfGanga wrote:I've owned shar-pei for about 12 years and it's pretty common in the breed. It usually affects large, deep chested breeds, but any dog can fall victim to it. It's horrible - my friend lost her old girl to it. She found her early one morning with her stomach swollen and rushed her to the emergency vets, but he couldn't save her. He opened her up and the tissue where it had twisted at the entrance and exit to the stomach were already neccrotic. She must have bloated in her sleep and hadn't even cried to wake my friend up.

I never feed more than a few pieces of dry food without soaking it first. You'll be shocked how much many dried complete foods can swell - they can double or even treble in size and you really don't want your dog eating a full stomach of dry food then taking a drink. The one I feed doesn't, but I soak it anyway because imagine eating a load of cream crackers yourself. You'd be thirsty, drink a load of water and end up with stomach cramps. Luckily, people's stomachs can't roll and twist like a dogs if there is too much gas in them.

How is your doggy? I hope it was just a false alarm.


Thanks Pants....

I just read your post out to hubby and he was like 'See? Told you!' lol

Yeah it was a false alarm. Hes only a small terrier but I had no idea what 'bloat' was until hubby said. Spike is lying down now, tired from his run around the garden.

Funnily enough, I hadn't thought about what you said about not allowing the dog to drink lots of water. I actually said to hubby, to give Spike a drink, thinking the soaked biscuits would go down. Hubby cried 'Nooo!!' But thinking logically, they would swell, yeah.

Good job he's on the ball with our pets eh? Thanks for your reply, makes a lot of sense and sorry to hear about your friends dog :(
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Re: "Bloat" - Second Biggest Killer In Dogs

Postby Snowleopard » Thu May 29, 2008 12:13 pm

I have never heard of Bloat before, thanks for alerting us about this Bubbles. I feed my dog dried food and I always wet it first but not long enough for it to swell up before he has it. He wouldn't wait that long. At the moment he is on Winalot Senior and it doesn't say to soak it first. I do know that you shouldn't feed a dog just before you take him for a walk or just after you have come back from a walk because they can get twisted guts and cause intestinal blockage and severe pain. I always measure the food I give him and he has one mug full morning and one mug full at tea time. He only has a carrot midday and a piece of apple at supper time, when I am having mine so I don't feel guilty when he is watching me. He has lost weight over the past few weeks because he was overweight and I have been advised by the vet to be strict with him as he just had a fatty lipoma removed from his groin. Thankfully it was nothing malignant but as he is a labrador and they do have a tendency to gain weight as they get older, I am being more careful with him. Vets bills are so expensive as well, so it pays in the long run to be strict with their diets. Thanks again, I will know what to look out for now if there are any problems.

I think I might change in fact and give him a mixture of partly wet dog food and part dried food now, as dried food can cause such problems and he is one of the breeds that seems to be susceptible to this Bloat. Having a dog is like having a child, they are just as much worry aren't they?
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Re: "Bloat" - Second Biggest Killer In Dogs

Postby bonnybraes1 » Thu May 29, 2008 12:36 pm

Quite honestly, I have never, ever fed mine only dried food - there were various scares about it when it first became widely available.
I use it as a supplement to other, wet food, but only as that.
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Re: "Bloat" - Second Biggest Killer In Dogs

Postby Snowleopard » Thu May 29, 2008 12:49 pm

Hi Bonnybraes, yes I am beginning to doubt that I am doing the right thing in feeding him dried food now. I think I have gone on to it more because he seemed to be passing a lot of wind when he was eating meat. He has had a lot of wind anyway on the dried food lately and so I had started him on the Senior food. I have just gone on to the Purina Web site and typed in a question for the experts on this dried food situation and I mentioned this Bloat. I have given them my details so hopefully they will get back to me on the ideal food regime. I know they are going to be all for their own product but they should be able to give me some advice. I will ring my vet also if I do not feel that happy with their reply.
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Re: "Bloat" - Second Biggest Killer In Dogs

Postby Snivelling Mole » Thu May 29, 2008 7:33 pm

im sure my dog had signs of this christmas night/early hours of boxing day. he kept me awake most of the night umping on my bed and nudging me. but because i was heavily pregnant and overdue i thought he was trying to tell me something about going into labour.

it wasnt until i mentioned it a few days later on another forum that someone who breeds dogs said it could have been bloat and we were lucky.

he had had his dinner and then the OH had given him the leftover crimbo dinner as well.
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Re: "Bloat" - Second Biggest Killer In Dogs

Postby saloongirl » Thu May 29, 2008 7:39 pm

Thank you for this post. Does anyone know if vegetables can cause bloat? I've started giving my 10 yr old dog some steamed vegatables mixed in with his dry food but now I wonder if this is ok?
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Re: "Bloat" - Second Biggest Killer In Dogs

Postby mickey1 » Thu May 29, 2008 8:45 pm

saloongirl wrote:Thank you for this post. Does anyone know if vegetables can cause bloat? I've started giving my 10 yr old dog some steamed vegatables mixed in with his dry food but now I wonder if this is ok?


Hi saloongirl

We have greyhounds which are a breed susceptible to bloat. Mine not had it thank God.

Vegetables are good for them, avoid the usual pulses and beans that give US wind :lol: :lol:

My dogs have always had scraps and leftovers and LOVE pasta and rice all good for them.
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Re: "Bloat" - Second Biggest Killer In Dogs

Postby saloongirl » Thu May 29, 2008 8:48 pm

Thank you mickey1......they are a worry aren't they...but worth it!
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Re: "Bloat" - Second Biggest Killer In Dogs

Postby mickey1 » Thu May 29, 2008 8:51 pm

saloongirl wrote:Thank you mickey1......they are a worry aren't they...but worth it!


Yep they are my OH often accuses me of putting my doggies first...
what's wrong with that?
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Re: "Bloat" - Second Biggest Killer In Dogs

Postby bjr » Thu May 29, 2008 10:21 pm

Yes I have heard about bloat, it is normally associated with big breeds and the use of dry dog food. I have had large breeds and used dry dog food and have never suffered the problem.

But I have always put their food down and let them eat as and when they want. Whether I have been lucky but none of my dogs have been greedy and woofed down the whole bowl, they tend to be little and often eaters, but I do watch and make sure they don't overload on dry food.
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Re: "Bloat" - Second Biggest Killer In Dogs

Postby Snowleopard » Thu May 29, 2008 10:30 pm

saloongirl wrote:Thank you for this post. Does anyone know if vegetables can cause bloat? I've started giving my 10 yr old dog some steamed vegatables mixed in with his dry food but now I wonder if this is ok?



My vet weighed my dog and said he needed to be on a diet, no treats whatsoever. He said he had no problem with a dog filling up on brocolli, cabbage, carrots and apples. I have given the carrots and apples but didn't want to risk having a lot of smelly wind with the other veg. It gives me wind so I thought it would do the same to the dog. :lol:
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Re: "Bloat" - Second Biggest Killer In Dogs

Postby littlepixie » Fri May 30, 2008 3:25 pm

Some of the cr@ppy dog foods on sale today are IMO the second biggest killer of dogs.

Bakers, Pedigree, Winalot etc and most other popular supermarket foods only contain 4% meat (well its not meat really its animal derivatives which include feathers, bone and offal) the rest of the bag is cheap bulk filler to make the weight.
The recipe in these foods varies from week to week depending on what is cheapest that week so these foods are VARIABLE forumla foods. This leads to bloat and stomach upsets in some dogs as from week to week the bag you buy is never the same.
With only 4% of the bag going to feed the dog the other 96% is excreted on your garden. Because the food contains so little meat the manufacturers use sugar as a flavour enhancer otherwise the dog being an omnivore or preferred carnivore wouldnt eat it.

Fixed formula foods usually contain approx 30% meat and its real meat not that horrible reclaimed stuff. Every bag is the same so less bloat/GDV.

A dog has to eat twice as much of a food containing 4% meat than one with a higher meat content just to get the same amount of calories hence false economy/bloat.

Pet food is the biggest con on the market. People buy Pedigree because of advertising, they think they are buying the best when they are not.

Arden Grange is one of the best fixed formula foods and is good value for money.
Natures Menu is one of the best pouches as it contains 60% meat compared to pedigree and whiskas which contain only 4%.

I laugh when I am at the checkout in the supermarket when I see pet owners proudly place their 12 cans or pouches on the belt I think to myself "I wonder what they would think if they knew they were buying 12 cans of water which is free from a tap".

Off me soapbox now (lol)
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Re: "Bloat" - Second Biggest Killer In Dogs

Postby Plath » Fri May 30, 2008 4:28 pm

Gosh, that bloat thing has frightened me. I have two rough collies. They have a mixture of dried food and Chappie. The reason they have Chappie is that one of them (Asha) tends to have runny bowels, and the vet told us to feed her Chappie as it is fish based and won't upset her so much. We still use the dry food mixed in with it though. Wonder now if this is O.K. Worried about it now. Doggies are my life.
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