Ipswich Murders - Jurors tour sights where 5 bodies found

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Ipswich Murders - Jurors tour sights where 5 bodies found

Postby bjr » Tue Jan 22, 2008 12:37 am

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/u ... 224679.ece


The jury in the "Suffolk Strangler" trial put on their winter coats and wellington boots yesterday to visit the areas where the naked bodies of five young women were found.

One by one the sites were crossed off as the nine men and three women were taken to the desolate and windswept places where the bodies were discovered over ten days in the run-up to Christmas 2006.

At four of the five sites, tributes had been left to the dead women; one from a sister, another a tree planted in memory of Gemma Adams, 25. Before they set out from Ipswich Crown Court, Mr Justice Gross had warned the jury not to let any tributes influence their judgment.

As the jurors made their visits over the course of the day in a heavily guarded convoy, a police helicopter hovered overhead occasionally. Several dozen police officers wearing fluorescent jackets patrolled the areas where the jury were due to visit.

The judge, Peter Wright, QC, for the prosecution, and Timothy Langdale, QC, for the defence, and court staff were in three cars behind the jury's coach. A police car and three police outriders led the convoy. Another police car followed.

Steve Wright, 49, who is accused of killing the women, did not accompany his defence team from court. He denies murdering Ms Adams, Tania Nicol, 19, Anneli Alderton, 24, Paula Clennell, 24, and Annette Nicholls, 29, between October 29 and December 13, 2006. They all worked as prostitutes in the red-light district of Ipswich.

The most poignant scene was one of the last. A few yards into sparse woodland adjacent to the A14, Ms Clennell's body was found two days after she went missing on December 10, showing "all the signs of having been hurriedly dumped".

The site has been turned into a shrine, with plastic novelty windmills near two wooden crosses. "Welcome to my Garden" is written on a large stone. Several poems have been left, as well as a tribute that says: "I will always love you little sister, sleep well and enjoy being free. Lots of love from Alice."

Led by counsel, the jurors had walked there from the site 100 yards away where Ms Nicholls was found on the same day. For 15 minutes they studied the site where Ms Nicholls was apparently carefully posed in a cruciform among the trees. A planted holly shrub and wilted pink daisies now adorn the area. Her body is believed to have been disposed of first.

Earlier in the day the first port of call had been to the home of Mr Wright, 49, a former publican, at his end-of-terrace Victorian maisonette on the edge of the red-light district. A policeman read a script to the jurors about the property as they stood outside. They did not see inside.

After ten minutes they got back on the coach and left for a short tour of the red-light district around Ipswich Town football ground. They were then taken five miles to Hintlesham, near where Ms Adams was found on December 2 in Belstead brook after being missing for 2› weeks. After spending 20 minutes looking at the brook from a small bridge the group was taken farther along the stream to where the body was found. Near by, a tree had been planted with a label that said "Gemma's tree". There were also four bunches of flowers.

Under a darkening sky the convoy continued its tour to the site where Ms Nicol was found. She was last seen in the red-light area of Ipswich on October 30. Her badly decomposed body was found in the same stream as Ms Adams, about three miles away. Near by was a note attached to red plastic flowers: "All our loving thoughts are with you Tania a special beautiful young lady with lots of love." The card was signed by several people including "Nan and Grandad". A red fluffy heart on a piece of string was also attached to railings.

Before the jurors left the court the judge told them: "You may encounter some floral or other tributes. As you will know, such tributes are frequently seen. You might have seen them at the scene of fatal road accidents. Tributes to the deceased are not evidence in the case and they are completely irrelevant. Do not allow tributes to influence you in any way. Those tributes cannot and do not assist you in deciding the evidence in the case."

After lunch, the jurors travelled to Nacton, where Ms Alderton's body was found, arranged in a cruciform position with her hair splayed out behind her.

They studied an area of woodland before moving to Levington, where the bodies of Ms Clennell, and Ms Nicholls were found.

The trial, which is expected to last six weeks, continues.
To my critics
When I'm in a sober mood, I worry, work and think,
When I'm in a drunken mood, I gamble, play and drink,
But when my moods are over and my time has come to pass,
I hope I'm buried upside down, so the world may kiss my ar*e
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Re: Ipswich Murders - Jurors tour sights where 5 bodies found

Postby bjr » Tue Jan 22, 2008 8:50 am

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jh ... ich122.xml

From Telegraph

Jury visits sites of Ipswich prostitute murders
By Nick Allen
Last Updated: 2:12am GMT 22/01/2008

Jurors in the trial of Steve Wright, the man accused of being the "Suffolk strangler", were taken on a tour of his home and to the bleak spots where the naked bodies of his five alleged victims were found.

Under grey skies and in drizzle, the nine men and three women jurors donned wellingtons and wax jackets and carried umbrellas as they tramped through fields and along streams on the outskirts of Ipswich.

The jurors walk through woods in Nacton, five miles from Ipswich, to where Anneli Alderton's body was found

Roads were closed and a police helicopter hovered overhead as the trial judge Mr Justice Gross, in waterproof boots and a green overcoat, ushered the jury down muddy tracks and through windswept woodland.

Wright, 49, a former forklift truck driver, has denied murdering Gemma Adams, 25, Tania Nicol, 19, Anneli Alderton, 24, Paula Clennell, 24, and Annette Nicholls, 29, over a six week period at the end of 2006.

He has admitted having sex with four of the girls, and picking up the fifth in his car, but denies having anything to do with their deaths.

Wright decided not to accompany the 27-strong court party on their journey and remained in his cell at Chelmsford prison.

The most poignant moment came as the jurors were shown the spot where the body of Miss Clennell was found dumped in sparse woodland only yards from a busy road near the village of Levington.

A shrine had been erected with a wooden cross, novelty windmills in the shapes of a frog and a ladybird, and fresh flowers. A wooden sign read "Welcome to my garden".

Miss Clennell's elder sister Alice had left a note which read: "I will always love you little sis, sleep well and enjoy being free. "

Another poem read: "If tears could build a stairway and memories a lane, I would walk right up to heaven and bring you home again."

The jury travelled in a white bus with three motorcycle outriders and two police cars. The judge, prosecutor Peter Wright, QC, and Wright's barrister Timothy Langdale, QC, were among those following in unmarked black cars.

They also visited the end of terrace maisonette Wright shared with his partner, Pam Wright, on the edge of Ipswich's red light district.

A police inspector read a prepared text about the house to the jury as they peered at the red door for 10 minutes. They did not go inside.

The ground floor windows were boarded up with plywood and upstairs they could see lace curtains. On the concrete drive there were two wheelie bins and three hanging baskets with the remains of flowers hanging from the grey brickwork.

They were then taken on a five minute drive around the red light district, passing Ipswich Town's football ground at Portman Road and stopping briefly.

Five miles west of town, the A1071 was closed off and police officers stood in fields to enforce a mile square perimeter as the jury arrived to see where the body of Gemma Adams was recovered from a brook.

On Burstall Bridge, near Hintlesham, they spent 20 minutes looking at the swift running stream which had trees running along both sides.

They were then taken down a muddy walkway between two lakes to the bend in the stream where Miss Adams's body was discovered.

On a boggy grass bank a buddleia tree had been planted with a label saying "Gemma's tree" and four bunches of flowers had been laid.

A short drive away they were shown where Miss Nicol's body was discovered in the same brook near the village of Copdock. Again there were flowers close by.

The judge had earlier told the jury: "Tributes to the deceased are not evidence in the case and they are completely irrelevant. Do not allow tributes to influence you."
To my critics
When I'm in a sober mood, I worry, work and think,
When I'm in a drunken mood, I gamble, play and drink,
But when my moods are over and my time has come to pass,
I hope I'm buried upside down, so the world may kiss my ar*e
User avatar
bjr
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Posts: 4181
Joined: Fri Nov 23, 2007 2:10 pm
Location: 3rd Cesspit from left of Rothley Towers


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