Kitchen Gadgets?

There are many forum members, that come from various Countries, so this is the place to post your favourite recipes for the 3A COOKERY BOOK, pictures, talk about your cultures, holiday recommendations and share with other members your Countries Culture. Also share your holiday snaps and your ventures whilst on holiday.

Kitchen Gadgets?

Postby Morg » Tue Feb 12, 2008 5:06 am

We've all got favourite pieces of kitchen and mine has to be my trusty Kenwood Chef 701A, http://www.torreelectrics.co.uk/acatalog/A701_model_Chef.html many spare parts for which are now obsolete. It dates back to the early 70's and will probably outlive me but if it doesn't, then I would replace it.... how else would I make sausages?

The most useless thing is a handle that supposedly fits onto the grill rack. To use the grill, the door has to be closed, cannot be closed with the handle attached. By the time the handle is fitted, the cheese on toast is carbonised, the smoke alarm shrieking, I mutter the extractor simply doesn't, black clouds swirl though the house as I run round like a headless chicken, throwing open doors and windows. Oven gloves are so much more effcient :D
Morg
First Time Offender
 
Posts: 635
Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2007 8:22 pm

Re: Kitchen Gadgets?

Postby celticcarla » Tue Feb 12, 2008 6:48 am

I love my new red kettle (goes with toffee apple red glass backsplash) use it 10 times a day.

Dont use the electric wok much these day so thats pretty much delegated to the back of the cupboard. :)
"We have a pact. This is our matter only. It is nobody else's business", says David Payne.
Gonçalo Amaral promises to clarify "all the lies created"
User avatar
celticcarla
Mafia Boss
 
Posts: 2552
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2008 11:13 am

Re: Kitchen Gadgets?

Postby Primavera » Tue Feb 12, 2008 9:41 pm

My favourite piece of equipment is my Magimix processor. I like it for lots of reasons. It has an induction motor. So, you don't have to work out what speed setting to use. Also, the blades are Sabatier and all the parts are easy to wash.

I also like my cast iron saucepans, Le Creuset, and my cast iron wok, which is black enamelled on the outside.
"I can no longer observe such pleased mad faces."
("Killers," by Alice Walker.)

http://frommybigdesk.blogspot.com/
User avatar
Primavera
First Time Offender
 
Posts: 602
Joined: Wed Nov 28, 2007 5:08 pm
Location: Casa nostra

Re: Kitchen Gadgets?

Postby HawkEyes1 » Tue Feb 12, 2008 11:11 pm

My favourite major gadget is a KitchenAid food mixer, with its clever dough, whisk, and beater attachments. I use it for bread-making, cake-making, pastry, scones, creamed soups, sauces, icecream, and sorbets. And best of all it quickly whips up egg whites and cream to perfection! But my least-used KitchenAid accessory is the pasta maker (with all of its attachments). It is a pain to set up and clean, and these days when I do make fresh pasta, I prefer to do the rolling and cutting by hand.

My favourite two minor kitchen gadgets are: 1) an old-fashioned French potato ricer for mashed potatoes (they are never gluey or lumpy, and it works like a dream for other root vegetables, such as parsnips, for a delectable parsnip puree), and 2) a simple metal apple corer/slicer (for a simple and elegant presentation of a dessert apple or to save time when making an apple galette or tart).
User avatar
HawkEyes1
On Parole
 
Posts: 1323
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 10:45 pm

Re: Kitchen Gadgets?

Postby anti-PhiloPastry » Wed Feb 13, 2008 12:12 am

I am pondering over a bread-maker. We do not like slice store bought bread, and like variety.

Does anyone have any recommendations? Is it expensive for the flour etc.

Also just bought my first steamer, and can now cook rice that is lovely and fluffy. Great for vegetables too. Still experimenting with it, but is so easy to set up and clean.
User avatar
anti-PhiloPastry
Been Cautioned
 
Posts: 311
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2007 9:04 pm

Re: Kitchen Gadgets?

Postby bjr » Wed Feb 13, 2008 12:36 am

My favourite items are a large larder cupboard for tins and jars and packets, microwave, freezer and can opener. Don't like cooking, cremate everything and not very good at it. Even if I follow a recipe right down to the minute detail, a disaster appears. After all these years I have given up and bought myself a decent can opener.
To my critics
When I'm in a sober mood, I worry, work and think,
When I'm in a drunken mood, I gamble, play and drink,
But when my moods are over and my time has come to pass,
I hope I'm buried upside down, so the world may kiss my ar*e
User avatar
bjr
Moderator
 
Posts: 4181
Joined: Fri Nov 23, 2007 2:10 pm
Location: 3rd Cesspit from left of Rothley Towers

Re: Kitchen Gadgets?

Postby HawkEyes1 » Wed Feb 13, 2008 1:32 am

anti-PhiloPastry wrote:I am pondering over a bread-maker. We do not like slice store bought bread, and like variety.

Does anyone have any recommendations? Is it expensive for the flour etc.

Also just bought my first steamer, and can now cook rice that is lovely and fluffy. Great for vegetables too. Still experimenting with it, but is so easy to set up and clean.

I cannot recommend any bread-maker personally - this particular gadget was popular here in twenty years ago, and people who had them certainly liked the convenience of them. I have, however, checked out the Bread Machines on the King Arthur Flour website, and they recommend two by the same company: The Zogirushi Home Bakery Supreme Bread Machine (which sells for $204.95) and the Zogirushi Mini-Bread Machine (for $179.95). Since King Arthur tests everything it sells - it has extensive test kitchens - they would not recommend a bad product! You can check out these Bread Machines at:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/lis ... egory=C144

I would still recommend using a powerful food mixer (with the special dough hook attachment) over a bread machine; then, since you like a wide variety of breads, you can use recipes from Elizbeth David's English Bread and Yeast Cookery or from Rose Levy Beranbaum's Bread Bible. The former book is British, while the latter is American, so you can take your pick! Both are classics, but with David's book you will get a history of bread-making, as well as recipes for items, such as crumpets and Chelsea buns dating back to the 18th century (but recommended making in miniature for today's waist size!). I use and recommend both books.

Another plus for a good food mixer is that you will be able to make many varieties of loaves, fancy plaited breads, and rolls in all kinds of shapes and sizes, whereas you are limited to one size with a bread machine. Flour is not a problem, as it is relatively inexpensive. For an all-purpose flour, I usually buy King Arthur's Unbleached Flour in 5 lb bags for $3.95 (less than £2.00). Specialty flours, such as spelt, pumpernickel, rye, and multi-grained, are more expensive but they go much further. I usually buy those in 1 1b or 2 1b bags, as they may not keep as well. Here you can see some of the flours available and the price ranges at:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/list.jsp?select=C79

There is also a recipe site, and I can tell you from experience, all of their recipes are top-notch. The link for RECIPES (including BREAD-MACHINE BREADS) can be found at:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/lan ... RecipeMain

In honour of St Valentine's Day, there is even a special featured recipe for CHOCOLATE VALENTINE HEARTS at:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/lan ... 9992785246

And, no, I don't own any stock in King Arthur Flour, but Zagat's gives their Baker's Catalogue a rave review:

King Arthur Flour, the Baker's Catalogue
http://www.bakerscatalogue.com

Zagat raves this online arm of a 200-year-old flour "mecca" offers a "fantastic," "high quality," selection spanning "everything for your baking needs," from the "best flours," mixes and "fine ingredients" to "hard-to-find accoutrements." Surveyors add the company is known for its "excellent customer service," which extends to its Web site in the form of "good recipes," and "technical information" about the products. They say its "a must if you bake."

...Zagat says prices are moderate.

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/index.js ... &aid=76855
Last edited by HawkEyes1 on Thu Feb 14, 2008 6:19 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
HawkEyes1
On Parole
 
Posts: 1323
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 10:45 pm

Re: Kitchen Gadgets?

Postby anti-PhiloPastry » Wed Feb 13, 2008 1:51 am

Gosh thank-you Hawkeyes, you certainly know your stuff, hopefully I will get around to trying some of your lovely recipes soon.

Although British supermarkets do now supply a great range of breads, they are rather expensive and not always available when I want really fresh bread. I like the idea of having freshly baked bread ready for breakfast, or for an impromptu meal.

I particularly love rye breads, and multi seeded breads. Store bought bread seems to be really doughy nowadays and has no taste. We end up throwing lots away, so I like the idea of having the opportunity to make smaller loaves and of course freshly made buns etc.

Will do some research and let you know if and what I purchase. One of my criteria though is that it cannot be huge and cumbersome as I have a really small kitchen and appliances really need to be put away once used which is a nuisance. We aim to redesign the kitchen this year and hopefully try to increase the size so that I can actually enjoy cooking again.

Thank you again for your help. :)
User avatar
anti-PhiloPastry
Been Cautioned
 
Posts: 311
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2007 9:04 pm

Re: Kitchen Gadgets?

Postby Primavera » Wed Feb 13, 2008 9:20 am

anti-PhiloPastry wrote:I am pondering over a bread-maker. We do not like slice store bought bread, and like variety.

Does anyone have any recommendations? Is it expensive for the flour etc.

Also just bought my first steamer, and can now cook rice that is lovely and fluffy. Great for vegetables too. Still experimenting with it, but is so easy to set up and clean.


I wouldn't advise buying a bread maker. I bought one and used it regularly for a few weeks. The bread was very good, but as another poster has said, you are limited to the shape of the bread maker's container.

Nowadays, with dried yeast, even making bread by hand, the old-fashioned way, is quite easy and is much quicker than any bread maker. A good food processor or mixer will be the job of kneading for you if you don't want to or cannot do that part of the process. If you can afford it, and haven't got one already of course, I recommend a Kitchen Aid mixer. Nothing better imo.
"I can no longer observe such pleased mad faces."
("Killers," by Alice Walker.)

http://frommybigdesk.blogspot.com/
User avatar
Primavera
First Time Offender
 
Posts: 602
Joined: Wed Nov 28, 2007 5:08 pm
Location: Casa nostra

Re: Kitchen Gadgets?

Postby Morg » Wed Feb 13, 2008 12:24 pm

anti-PhiloPastry I'm with Hawkeye and Primavera reference to a breadmaker. I've always used my ancient Kenwood Chef, or if in a stonking mood, my own fair hand. I was given an expensive breadmaker Panosonic I seem to recollect) some years ago and ahem, I gave it away with a willing heart. A good mixer will cost more initially than a bread maker but, it offers versatility. For my mixer, I have among the attachments, a mincer and sausage filler, using them both, buying meat from a local butcher who still slaughters meat on the premises (so good, he provides the likes of Jamie Oliver). Home made pizza base is fabulous, minus any 'flour improvers' or preservatives.

Baking your own bread is satisfying, can be frozen part baked etc. Perhaps you have a friend who has a powerful mixer you could try? Smaller mixers do not have the power to cope with the workload.
Morg
First Time Offender
 
Posts: 635
Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2007 8:22 pm

Re: Kitchen Gadgets?

Postby Primavera » Wed Feb 13, 2008 12:48 pm

HawkEyes1 wrote:My favourite major gadget is a KitchenAid food mixer, with its clever dough, whisk, and beater attachments. I use it for bread-making, cake-making, pastry, scones, creamed soups, sauces, icecream, and sorbets. And best of all it quickly whips up egg whites and cream to perfection! But my least-used KitchenAid accessory is the pasta maker (with all of its attachments). It is a pain to set up and clean, and these days when I do make fresh pasta, I prefer to do the rolling and cutting by hand.

My favourite two minor kitchen gadgets are: 1) an old-fashioned French potato ricer for mashed potatoes (they are never gluey or lumpy, and it works like a dream for other root vegetables, such as parsnips, for a delectable parsnip puree), and 2) a simple metal apple corer/slicer (for a simple and elegant presentation of a dessert apple or to save time when making an apple galette or tart).


Oooohhh!!!! You've got a Kitchen Aid! I am sooooo jealous!
"I can no longer observe such pleased mad faces."
("Killers," by Alice Walker.)

http://frommybigdesk.blogspot.com/
User avatar
Primavera
First Time Offender
 
Posts: 602
Joined: Wed Nov 28, 2007 5:08 pm
Location: Casa nostra


Return to From Around the World - Living, Holiday, Food and Drink

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests